About

10917110_10152656181460642_1541879761715627521_nMichele Leavitt, author of the memoir WALK AWAY, is also the 2013 winner of the inaugural Michael Macklin Poetry Prize, and 2010 winner of the William Allen Creative Nonfiction Prize from The Ohio State University. She’s a high school dropout, former trial attorney, adoptee, and hepatitis C survivor who has taught writing, literature, and critical thinking in New England, Japan, Florida, and Idaho. Her poems and prose are published in a wide variety of print and online journals, including Guernica, The North American Review, Sycamore Review, Baltimore Review, HEArt: Human Equity Through ArtThe Humanist, The Journal, Mezzo Cammin, and Passager

Michele is available for freelance writing and editing assignments. Contact her at michelejleavitt (at) gmail (dot) com.

4 thoughts on “About

  1. “Hidden in a Suitcase” was very moving. Addiction is a curse, its impact far reaching. So much pain and suffering. I understand a lot more clearly how families are tied together by the genetics of addiction. I knew and thought I understood this, but your writing has opened it up for me. Alcoholism is all over my family. Over eating, too. Compassion is what I work on, for self and others. We all need loving kindness and the meditation for it (Metta) helps it come about. Best wishes to you and your famiy. So glad you found them.

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      1. Smoke & Molasses stopped too soon for me. I understand (I think) why it did as Tina is the quintessential storytelling liar, weaving a tale to pull you in. Keeping you hanging. Oh, how I want to follow her, or follow you, that is. Who was Daddy?

        In one sense, from my own “who (the hell!) was Daddy?” perspective, it doesn’t matter if you know his name or see his picture because he is and will remain an unknown. The type of man who spreads his seed and keeps on going not involving himself in his offsprings’ lives. An emotional zero who is in the room and not, all at once. This story reminds me of my own father whom I knew well and not at all.

        I want so much more of this story! I found I was uneasy about what might happen, what you would hear.

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  2. Thank you so much for reading my work! I’m currently completing a book-length memoir manuscript about my reunion with my family, and one of the threads is the “who’s your daddy” question.
    Also, a “memoirella” (don’t know what else to call it!) about my journey from teenage runaway to trial attorney is in final editing now and scheduled for publication by Kindle Singles this spring.

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